“We should just call it #lame”

November 26, 2013

Hashtags. Twitter started the craze, then other sites followed. What has happened in the meantime is that they have become overused. To the point of comedy. Just look at a few tweets these days, hashtag orgasms are what some people are enjoying.

Alas, however, when companies or candidates use hashtags for the sake of using hashtags, the results are, at best, ineffective. At worst, they can backfire embarrassingly.

This month, JPMorgan Chase scrapped an attempt to engage Twitter users with the hashtag “#askJPM” after sarcastic and off-topic responses poured in. This brings to mind similar #fails by McDonald’s and BlackBerry, in which poorly conceived marketing strategies quickly inspired users across the Internet to lampoon their products and services.

Candidates, businesses and advertising firms that wish to boost their online presence or that of their clients can do two things to improve their approaches to social media.

More >

If you are feeling down, perhaps a little blue, take a moment to search Twitter for the #askJPM hashtag. I promise you will feel much better.

A little overuse of the hashtag?

Wow2

 

And one of the biggest lies in the universe, too: “Tweets are my own.” Not with those hashtags, buddy. You are bought and paid for by your employer as are “your” tweets.

For the love of all things holy, stop with the hashtag madness.

Thanks for the image, Darren.


A Great Leader Hires Good People

November 25, 2013

DilbertPeople


InformationWeek: Amazon Again Beats IBM For CIA Cloud Contract

November 13, 2013

“As a threshold matter, IBM lacked any chance of winning a competition with AWS for this C2S contract,” the ruling said, and therefore it lacked standing to claim prejudice in the way the contract had been awarded. The GAO failed to assess whether IBM had the standing to file the protest that it did, said the ruling.

The court also objected to GAO failing to spot maneuvering by IBM’s lawyers. “The GAO failed to address the way in which IBM manipulated its pricing to create a bid protest issue,” it said. IBM “drastically departed from the approach followed in its initial proposal when it came to submitting its final proposal revision” for one set of requirements, known as Scenario 5. IBM had closely questioned the CIA on what it expected from the Scenario 5 requirements. By revising its final bid on Scenario 5, it gained the position to “argue that the agency did not evaluate Scenario 5 prices on a common basis. IBM was the only offeror who appeared to ‘misunderstand’ the Scenario 5 pricing requirements,” the court said.

More >

An interesting look into business practices at IBM, when $600M is at stake.


Bathroom Artwork

November 12, 2013

No, this isn’t “one of those posts.”

In a men’s room, in the building in which I work, there is a reproduction of a Winslow Homer painting. I believe that this restroom is the only one with any sort of wall decoration.

Here is the picture:

 

Winslow1-sized

So, what is so special about this picture? It’s in the details.

WinslowSig

 

 

Damn, that’s funny.

 

 


Connect14: Creating Buzz by Announcing Updated Agenda Monday

November 12, 2013

In order to garner more interest, more reservations, and more “buzz,” IBM is publishing accepted speakers/sessions on Mondays. Yesterday, they released these sessions/speakers of particular interest (full list is at the link, below):

Application Development

The Mobile Disruption – Why XPages Development is Targeting Mobile First – John Head, PSC Group; John Beck, IBM

IBM Domino Application Development – Today and Tomorrow – Pete Janzen, IBM; Martin Donnelly, IBM

Extending IBM SmartCloud Applications in 30 Minutes – Michael Blackstock, IBM

Turbo-charge Your Enterprise Social Network with Analytics – Vincent Burckhardt, IBM; David Robinson, IBM

IBM Worklight for IBM Domino Developers – Mat Newman, IBM

Infrastructure and Deployment

What’s New in IBM Notes – Scott Souder, IBM

Sametime 9.0 Voice and Video Deployment – Uri Segev, IBM

Devil in the (Data) Details – Mobile, Cloud and Your Enterprise Network Wes Morgan, IBM

Best Practices

Simplifying The S’s – Single Sign-On, SPNEGO and SAML – Gabriella Davis, The Turtle Partnership, Chris Miller, Connectria

Uno! Deux! Three! Making Localization of XPages Apps as Easy as 1-2-3 – Kathy Brown, PSC Group; Brad Balassaitis, PSC Group

Show Me the Money! The Value in Social Business – Sasha Beerendonk

Next Generation Project Management: Collaborating Inside and Outside the Box – Mikkel Heisterberg, OnTime by Intravision; Mat Newman, IBM

Show ‘n Tells

Proper Connections Development for Proper Domino Developers – Matt White, Fynn Consulting; Mark Myers, London Developer Coop

How to Create a Perfect Profile: A Hitchhiker’s Guide to A Smarter Workforce – Mitch Cohen, Colgate-Palmolive; Chris Whisonant, Best Methods

IBM Traveler Highly Availability – Deployment and Best Practices – Daniel Nashed, nash.com

More >

These are all excellent additions to the Connect agenda. Whether a first time attendee, or a multi-year delegate, the speakers listed are fantastic. And, if you find them wandering the halls/parties/Product Showcase and you strike up a conversation, you will discover that they are very friendly and willing to share more of their knowledge.

Be sure to check back with the Social Insights blog every Monday for a new round of accepted sessions and speakers.


Chris Marvin: For today’s veterans, service isn’t over when the uniform is put away

November 11, 2013

I fought in Afghanistan. When people learn of my military service, I get a variety of comments — none more common than “Thank you for your service.” My response sometimes surprises people. I look them in the eye and say, “You’re welcome.”

. . . When I began to respond with “You’re welcome,” I was concerned that it shocked people. I wondered if I was being too flippant or prideful. Then I realized that their reaction said something about what “Thank you for your service” now means in American culture. The phrase has become a reflex for civilians who don’t know what else to say. Most people today play a minimal role in national defense beyond expressing gratitude to those who have served on their behalf.

More >

When he first came home, after graduating from the University of Parris Island, you could see that “Thank you for your service” resulted in discomfort for Number One Son. But now, after nearly four years of service, he is used to that phrase and responds to the individual thanking him.

Number Two Son, who hasn’t been off base in nearly 5 months, will soon go through the same thing. However, with his brother coaching him, I am sure that he will not have the same discomfort and will be better prepared for your greetings and thanks.

I am extremely proud of my two sons, just ask me sometime. 🙂

Happy Veterans Day.

Thanks for the link, Matt.


“Restless Pants Syndrome”

November 8, 2013

I wonder to whom this should be dedicated?

RestlessPants