Beyond Bank: Goodbye IBM Notes

March 31, 2015

Another one bites the dust. This time, in Australia.

Customer-owned financial institution, Beyond Bank, is dumping Lotus Notes and an ageing, legacy CRM app as its moves to the cloud.

Beyond Bank will soon start deploying Microsoft Office 365 to around 600 users at its head office in Adelaide and other branches across the ACT, NSW, South Australia, and Western Australia. The cloud solution will be used to access SharePoint Online, Lync Online, and Exchange Online

The reporter did not say whether IBM’s cloud services were ever considered, but they will be running a dual environment, Notes/Domino and Office365, for a while.

More >


Beyond Bank: Goodbye IBM Notes

March 31, 2015

Customer-owned financial institution, Beyond Bank, is dumping Lotus Notes and an ageing, legacy CRM app as its moves to the cloud.

Beyond Bank will soon start deploying Microsoft Office 365 to around 600 users at its head office in Adelaide and other branches across the ACT, NSW, South Australia, and Western Australia. The cloud solution will be used to access SharePoint Online, Lync Online, and Exchange Online

The reporter did not say whether IBM’s cloud services were ever considered, but they will be running a dual environment, Notes/Domino and Office365, for a while.

More >


CloudPro: Amazon WorkMail vs IBM Notes: Will it be a knockout fight?

February 4, 2015

You see, here’s the thing: no matter what you hear/see at an IBM event or from your IBM representative, there seems to be a disconnect between that message and the one you read on the internet. A chasm, if you will.

The public cloud market has coalesced around three big players: Amazon, Google and Microsoft (and that’s despite what other vendors have to say about the matter).  Of these, Amazon has established a massive lead leaving Microsoft and Google to play catch up.

Wow, “three big players.” Not one starts with the letter “I.” Interesting.

However, when you do read about IBM, it is never flattering. Nor is there any mention of something like “Verse,” since the analysts weren’t invited to ConnectED (regardless, you have to wonder about the amount of work IBM *is* doing with analysts when some/most/all have no idea about Verse). And even if some were at ConnectED (and there were), the number of press releases equaled zero.

And, as such, you get this:

The very fact that Amazon has got WorkMail off the ground (it’s expected to be launched in Q2 of this year) is an achievement in itself and in a week in which IBM got stuck into its layoff, sorry, restructuring programme, it’s a reminder of the nimbleness with which Amazon can move.

IBM itself had its own enterprise mail system but who talks about Lotus Notes these days? It’s still with us (as IBM Notes), but does anyone see it as a contender in a world that’s shifting to cloud. Amazon understands that perfectly and that’s why, despite the caveats, WorkMail is sure to attract a number of users later this year.

Not one mention of whatever IBM is calling their cloud service these days. Nothing about Verse, which is pretty much all that IBM is featuring (to whom?), and continue to point out IBM Notes. I am going to say that, in retrospect, IBM should have killed the “Lotus” brand long before they actually came around and did it. It seems like there is way too much baggage with that name, and it doesn’t seem like it is abating.

Finally, how is it, in an article dated today, that this individual knows nothing about Verse? Especially since it’s been Priority Number One for months, probably a year, with IBM? Perhaps it’s that no one even considers IBM, let alone try to find any message coming out of Armonk?

No one, it seems, but the faithful. As noted by the one, lone, comment.

*sigh*

Link: CloudPro: Amazon WorkMail vs IBM Notes: Will it be a knockout fight?


We left IBM because there was no webmail

March 6, 2013

Q: Why did you want to move to cloud-based services for messaging and collaboration?

Fox: Our workforce requires easy access to corporate information, emails, and colleagues to work productively. Our on-premise IBM Lotus Notes email solution did not provide web mail. There was no instant messaging, no presence, and no web conferencing, so it was challenging to communicate and collaborate on the road, at home, or at customer sites. We needed more cost-effective, flexible technologies to help us get away from this whole idea of a workplace being a ‘place.’ Moving to the cloud seemed like a natural evolution.

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Way too many snarky comments running through my head, so it’s best if I just let the CIO’s words tell you why the Microsoft cloud is superior to an existing, on-premises solution.