Michael Sampson: IBM Verse – It’s Here

In arguably the best review of IBM Verse I’ve read to date, Michael Sampson provides his thoughts on the product.

I think IBM Verse – or any email system with in-built intelligence – needs to focus more on changing sender behaviour. We see elementary forms of this with the “encouragement” in Outlook Web Access to send links to files in OneDrive rather than the attachment directly. I would like to see the analytics power of Watson applied to encouraging senders to be more effective in their use of email and other tools.

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IBM Verse: IBM Support Meetings and Verse

I’ve seen a lot of things in my life, as you can well imagine. However, this has to be one of the more interesting things I’ve seen.

As a member of a Collaboration and Messaging Team, I do, on “occasion,” have need to open PMRs with IBM Technical Support. I have found that asking the IBM Tech to do a screen share with me to be a very effective method of troubleshooting issues with them.

Today, the day after provisioning of my IBM Verse Basic account and the day I actually was able to log in to Verse, I needed to do a screen share with IBM on an open PMR. As always, the technician sent me a link to his meeting room.

Nothing unusual about that, it happens all the time when IBM and I are going to work a PMR.

What is unusual is what happened after I clicked the link.

This is what I see on a workstation that has never logged into IBM Verse:

versemeetings1

And this is what I see when I click the link on a workstation that has logged into IBM Verse:

versemeeting2

A “slight” difference in the log in page, which really threw me for a loop.

Yes, I can attend the meeting using my IBM Verse credentials. But that was not the expected behavior.

No, I did not clear my browser cache before attending the meeting (why would I do that?). However, later, after ending the meeting, I did clear the cache, restarted the browser, and saw this:

versemeetings1

 

Weird, right?

 

IBM Verse: Day Two Usage

Yesterday, I reported my experience with IBM Verse after (finally) being provisioned.

Today, I am happy to report that, once I log in to Verse, I see this:

versebasic3

This is the experience in Firefox 37.0.1. Yesterday, I was on an unsupported browser. Today, it’s supported.

What changed?

That is a great question. What I can tell you is that, thanks to either this blog or my tweet, IBM contacted me, asked me a couple of questions (sorry, I didn’t think that the underlying OS was relevant to a browser issue, but I guess I might be wrong. The answer to that question was/is “Windows, BTW), and I was able to successfully log into Verse.

Wow, it is really white. Almost “you have to wear sunglasses to view this page” white.

Now I get to start playing with it.

Thank you, IBM, for granting me access.

IBM Verse: Day One Usage

IBM has (finally) provisioned my Verse Basic account. How did Day One of Verse go for me?

Attempt One to log on to Verse resulted in this:

versebasic1

Hmm, refresh the browser.

Now, I see the login page. Again.

Attempt Two to log on to Verse resulted in this:

versebasic2

This appears in Chrome, version 41.0.2272.118 m, Firefox, version 37.0.1, and IE, version 9.0.36.

Now, I understand Tom’s post:

noverseforyou

*sigh*

This isn’t as easy as I had hoped. Nor is it a “#NewWaytoWork.”

FAQ about IBM Verse Basic

“All” your questions about IBM Verse Basic have been answered in the FAQ about IBM Verse Basic.

There are some exceptions to this list, like the answer to Question 16:

Q16. How can my friends and family sign up for IBM Verse Basic?

Oh, it’s easy to sign up, but good luck with the acknowledgement, welcome e-mail, and a user name/password. I still haven’t received mine. And it’s been at least two months.

Thanks, Bruce, for the link.

 

 

Old is New: Muting Threads or Conversations in IBM Verse

I was reminded this week that people have short attention spans.

IBM has released IBM Verse and one of the major features that IBM tours is muting threads or conversations in e-mail. That is, basically, if you are tired of being on an e-mail thread, you can “mute” it so that it does not appear.

This feature is not new.

From May 2010, I present to you how to mute threads and conversations in GMail and Outlook.

My fraternity mailing list is home to a great group of people, including some great entrepreneurs and some great investors. But when you get 400 opinionated MIT grads on a single mailing list, and the topic shifts to anything controversial, the discussion might explode. We’ve had well over 125 emails come through in the last three days after someone brought up the health care bill, and several folks have emailed to get off the discussion list list.

Don’t do that! Instead, use these super easy techniques to mute or filter the discussion out of your Inbox in less than 30 seconds. It’s faster than removing yourself from the mailing list, and better too, because when this discussion peters out, you’ll still be on the list in case something interesting comes up later.

Having some sort of parity with GMail and Outlook is good. Touting this as “new” is a bit disingenuous.

Thanks for the reminder, vowe.